Cess & Septic Tankered Waste

Under the regulations laid out by the Environment Act, businesses are obliged to ensure that waste is disposed of safely, with no danger to people or the environment.

Tankered waste is liquid waste that is unsuitable for discharge into the public sewer system, or waste that is received by us from tankers that service areas without a connection to the public sewers. This might include waste from septic tanks, cesspools, chemical toilets.

Our tankered waste experts have years of experience in ensuring that all waste is responsibly dealt with. Our industry leading facility at Howdon holds an EA permit stating they can treat waste, and do so responsibly and with exemplary eco-friendly credentials.

The ‘Power from poo’ production at Howdon, more formally known as Thermal Hydrolysis Advanced Anaerobic Digestion (AAD), started in 2012 with the company generating electricity. Three years later, this was followed by the production of gas for the National Grid, meaning customers were now cooking on poo too.

The Howdon plant is the company’s largest sewage treatment works and treats up to 12,000 litres of wastewater from customer homes and businesses every second. Its £8 million gas to grid plant is the biggest of its kind in the industry.

The industry-leading ‘Power from poo’ process has transformed sewage sludge from being a waste product that needed a lot of energy to clean up before it could return to the natural environment, into a fuel being used to produce green energy. The innovative process is cutting the company’s annual operating costs of around £9 million and delivering a significant cut of more than 20% in the company’s carbon footprint.

The Thermal Hydrolysis AAD process involves pre-treating the leftover sludge and heating it in something similar to a giant pressure cooker to around 165 degrees Celsius under six bar of pressure. This process destroys any pathogens and breaks down the cell structure, which is then fed to billions of bacteria in giant digester tanks, making it easier for them to eat.

As the bacteria eat the sewage sludge, they release biogas (methane and CO2), which is similar to a person burping and letting off wind. These gases are collected in huge 11-metre diameter sized golf ball-like biogas storage bags, before being fed into a high pressure water wash gas clean up system where the methane and CO2 are separated.

The gas to grid process has a higher financial return than electricity generation and was introduced as it is more efficient than CHP electricity production due to the amount of heat energy losses from the gas engines while creating electricity.